Planning the Ultimate Outdoor Backpacking Adventure

The great outdoors is one of the great treasures this country has to offer. There is such a range of climate, geography, and landscape. But, you don’t have to stay here, of course, to enjoy the wilds. If you’re a bit of a jet setter you might decide you want to head off to a different country to go on an outdoor backpacking adventure. Whatever you choose it’s pretty clear that something like backpacking has a broad appeal.

This is because it gives us a more stripped back experience, and allows us to be at one with nature. Anyone who has the travel bug and enjoys being outdoors will get a lot out of a backpacking trip. But, you need to know and plan for what to expect so you can take steps to have the best possible time.

12. Fact: Quick change in weather conditions by Cludes Tomato on 500px.com

Do You Have Supplies?

First things first, you need to make sure you have the right supplies for backpacking. There are plenty of things you’re going to need for your outdoor adventures. And it’s important to make sure you have everything you need. Don’t forget that most of the time you’re going to be out in the middle of nowhere. So you have to have important supplies with you. You’ll need a first aid kit in case of any minor injuries. Your own tent wouldn’t go amiss either unless you plan on paying for hostels the whole time. It’s important to have a large and sturdy backpack and to make sure you carry a map and compass safely. Bringing the right supplies is essential for having a great adventure.

Map Your Route

You need to make sure you know exactly where you’re going. And the way to do this is to make sure you map your route out. You have to get a map and figure out the route you’re going to take. It’s vital you know where you’re going so you don’t get lost. This way you’ll also be able to figure out the most efficient and safe route. Make a decision about the sort of backpacking you want to do, such as desert hiking, and then look up the best possible routes to take. You need to map everything out in detail before returning you set out on your journey.

Right direction by Dina Belenko on 500px.com

Don’t Go Alone

It’s important to remember that these kinds of trips and adventures can sometimes be quite intense. And that’s why you need to make sure you don’t try to go it alone. Make sure you always have a buddy or friend with you. This is important for safety and security, and will help you complete tasks much more quickly. You’ll also be able to help and encourage each other if you start to struggle. The best thing to do is approach a friend who is a bit outdoorsy like you, and see if they want to join you.

Planning the ultimate backpacking adventure is important to make sure you have a great time. You need to make sure you truly enjoy the great outdoors when traveling. And the way to do this is to plan out your journey so you can enjoy it safely, and you know where to go and what to do.

 

Night Time-Lapses – Five Things You Didn’t Think About

There’s a lot of information on night time photography out there – but it usually talks about the camera! Let’s talk about what you’ll need to take with you if you’re shooting at night to keep yourself safe! I’ve made a short list of what I needed recently when taking a time-lapse of Pendennis Castle at night-time on the rocks.

 

Light

Taking the time-lapse above from the rocks next to an old shoreside castle, I had to be careful not to slip, drop my gear, or fall into a rockpool! It was important you can see exactly what you’re doing! I used a large Asaklitt battery-powered LED camping lamp to guide my way, keeping me safe in the knowledge that I wasn’t about to step into the unknown! It also sat next to me, illuminating my camera – it’s always useful to see your settings, and to check that your tripod is indeed on firm ground (At one point it slipped and I damaged my widest lens! Be careful shooting on wet rocks!)

Asaklitt Clas Olsen LED Camping Lamp

Of course, be careful where you’re shining it! In the first few frames of images, the castle was lit up from the light where I was looking for a place to sit as I waited! The lamp I have even comes with a remote control attached to the top – useful to leave on the rocks, and check from a safe distance if the tide was creeping dangerously closer to the camera!

Warmth

This may depend on where you’re shooting, what the conditions are, and how long you plan to stay out – but you should make sure you’re comfortable and warm – whether that means wearing a hat, or packing a fully loaded tent, that’s up to you! In my case, I knew I wasn’t staying out all night, but wanted to be warm and comfortable, so I bought along my trusty sleeping bag and self-inflating roll mat.

Once I arrived on the rocks, I soon realised it was too steep and jagged to set up a roll mat. I didn’t want it to get pierced, so I left it rolled up. I also didn’t think I needed the sleeping bag. I started shooting around midnight and felt just fine, but when I was sat on the cold rocks for half an hour, the chill started getting to me and I was glad I bought it along. I unrolled it and found a place I could safely sit overlooking the camera’s shooting position but away from the ever-nearing tide! The roll mat made a good headrest too!

Energy

Not for your camera, but for you!

To get the images above, I prepared the camera and sat on the rocks monitoring it from midnight to almost 3am. I was so glad to have some hot food to keep me going, and to warm me up!

Asaklitt Clas Olsen 6 Piece cook set with Kelly kettle hobo Stove and Beans

All you need is a tin of beans (or any other food you feel like!) camping stove and something to cook it in, and you’re ready to go! I’ve got a neat little 6 piece stainless steel camping cook set that folds down really small, containing a frying pan, 2 saucepans with lids and another tiny little saucepan – the smallest one was fine for this night, but it’s nice to know you can probably cook a full breakfast in the morning if you’re shooting all night!

Just make sure you either get a tin of food with the pull ring or a multi-tool to open it! And don’t forget cutlery like we did in Dartmoor!

Entertainment

Just because you’re out in the wild all night, you may not be able to relax and enjoy nature as much as if you were on a camping trip! Make sure you have something to keep you occupied, as you’ll likely be sat around waiting a while! If you can get far away from your camera’s subject, you can use your light to read a book, or get some paperwork done! If you’re only out for one night, you’ll likely be able to rely on electronics to keep you busy, but don’t count on getting a mobile signal or charging batteries in the middle of a field, or out by the sea! As an avid video gamer, I took my trusty DS Lite for this trip and finished off my current game of Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow. Just make sure the light from any electronics doesn’t mess with your shot!

Protection

This time for your gear, not you!

One of the problems with shooting at night is condensation – everything gets covered in it. You can protect your lens with a handy dew heater, but what about everything else?

Asaklitt Clas Olsen Dry Bag

A dry bag is a must to keep all your gear in! it’ll not only protect your camera equipment but also any sleeping gear, and make sure your cook equipment doesn’t get ruined! Mine is an awesome shade of orange, meaning I can see it no matter how dark it gets! I found that with the lamp inside I even have a nice bright orange light to lead my way! It can be folded down to any size you need and clips together with a very useful handle at the top. Very useful indeed. I’m tempted to use to to cover my camera one day – it’ll keep it protected and that window in the middle will allow me to shoot through it! As you can see in the image above, this is also from the Clas Ohlson Asaklitt range.

Once you have your timelapse of images, you process it like the clip at the top of the post, or like the images below! Happy shooting!

Star Trail of Pendennis Castle

Have we missed anything? What would you take with you? Is there anything you’ve found useful in the past? Let us know in the comments below!

How To Truly Enjoy The Great Outdoors When Traveling

They don’t call it the great outdoors for nothing! Whether you’re planning a trip or are currently enjoying one, making the most of it will be right at the top of your priority list. However, the ways that we make the most of a delicious meal, or an expensive coat, are different to how we make the most of the great outdoors. Keen to know how you can truly enjoy your experience while it lasts? Then read on…

Go for the road (less traveled)

There is something incredibly fulfilling about enjoying the great outdoors via an RV or motorhome! This is probably because it allows you the best of both worlds. You can access the places that you want, and have room to take the necessary equipment with you. However, you have a place to cook in the mornings, and shower in the evenings. These little conveniences mean that you can actually enjoy your time in nature, without feeling grubby or peckish!

Sleep under the stars

Whether you chose to travel by RV or not, be sure you sleep under the stars at least once during your time in the great outdoors. The sense of adventure will be magnificent, plus all of that fresh air will do wonders for your lungs! Just don’t forget your sleeping bag!

Dawntreader by zach bright on 500px.com

Join in

If there is a certain activity that is very popular where you are headed try it out. The chances are that it is popular for a reason. Even if you’ve never fished before, try fishing for the first time if it’s a big deal where you’re headed. The same goes for all other outdoor activities too, be that surfing, canoeing, bouldering or something else. Join in and find out what all the fuss is about!

Leave your technology behind

We are such a connected world these days. Leaving the devices that allow us to stay in touch with everyone and everything behind can be touch. But a far more authentic and fulfilling experience will be waiting for you if you let these things be for a while. Chat with a friend you’ve met along the route, instead of telling your friend on Facebook all about it. Turn off the music on your iPod, and listen to the music of bird song instead. It might still be wise to take your phone with you, especially if you’re out in the wild, or deep in a park. Just keep it charged up, switched off and in the bottom of your bag; instead of glued to your hand!

Be spontaneous

When out in nature, things may occur that you weren’t expecting. Imagine this; halfway through a hot and sweaty 10-mile hike, you’ll find a beautiful lake you didn’t expect to find. The water is a mesmerizing blue. Others are swimming in the lake enjoying the sunshine. If this happens, don’t let anything hold you back from getting involved. “I’m not wearing the right clothes!” and “I don’t want to get my hair wet” are excuses that just won’t cut it! Being spontaneous allows you to enjoy nature to its fullest- even it’s beautiful surprises!

Maligne Lake by Chris  Burkard on 500px.com

How To Choose The Right Sleeping Bag

I’ve been looking at buying a new sleeping bag recently and found how difficult it is to find one that suits every need! I thought I’d write a quick guide to show others the best way to choose their own!

IT really comes down to what you’ll be using it for – are you just looking for something to sleep in on your mate’s sofa after a night out? Or are you defying death in the most extreme places on earth? (Let us know if you are, we’d love to hear about it!)

It’s likely that you’ll need to prioritise some qualities – and I’ve drawn up a little graphic here to illustrate it!

sleeping-bag-choice

Now the problem is, you probably can’t get to the snowy summit of this chart and have all three, you usually have to choose just two!

Light and cheap

Now this one’s pretty easy. You can get yourself a light and cheap sleeping bag, something you would use for festivals or summer camping trips – but be aware that these won’t keep you warm during the colder months, and many don’t go below temperatures below freezing.

This means you’ll have something nice and light you can pack down small into a pack, but it’s too dangerous to use in winter, and possibly even fall or spring! Always consider safety above everything: if you can’t afford or carry a warm enough sleeping bag for your trip, don’t go camping!

Warm and cheap

Unfortunately the warmer the bag, the more it usually costs, but you can trade off some of the cost in extra weight! Modern sleeping bags are filled with a synthetic microfibre that emulates down. It’s much cheaper than a down sleeping bag, but weighs much more and often doesn’t compact as much! As I’m on a strict budget, for our Ben Nevis trip, I recently purchased the Mountain Warehouse Microlite 1400 which certainly falls into this bracket. It’s comfortable down to -4°c and only cost me £44.99! The only downside is it’s pretty heavy for hiking at 1.9kg and it packs down pretty large! It’s certainly going to go outside of my bag, as it won’t fit in.

Light and warm

This is the bracket you’re lucky to be in! If you can afford it you can go to the best sleeping bag manufacturers and have a wealth of incredible materials and technology at your disposal. For example, at the same weight as the sleeping bag I just bought, you could buy the incredible Alpkit ArticDream that would keep you comfortable at an unbelievable -48°c!! (probably not suitable for summer though!)

 

 

So where do you fit into the graphic? What’s the most important quality in a sleeping bag in your eyes? Leave a comment below!

Should You Use A Tripod For Your Travel Photos?

Today I’ll discuss the matter of tripods, and how they fit with travel photography. Tripod come in a variety of shapes and sizes, made with various materials and with heads for various needs – but do we need them when travelling?

As with many things in photography – it depends!

What and where will you be shooting?

If you’re shooting street photography in Barcelona for example – you’re going to want to travel light and not draw attention to all your gear. You’ll likely want a small perhaps mirrorless camera, and a single small lens with it. And that’s all!

Barcalona Gotico ArchBarcelona Montserrat Landscape

Personally when I’m going into cities and travelling light, I rely on just a small compact and shoot handheld (resulting in the shots above).

However you’re at the mercy of light! If it starts getting darker, your shutter time will increase, leading to blurry images! make sure you’re shooting at a high shutter speed if you want to go hand held! it really depends on your lens, and whether you have image stabilisation, but if you stick to 100th of a second you shouldn’t go wrong! As you get lower, your shot time will get higher, so think about trading it off for a higher ISO. grainy pictures are better than unusable blurry pictures any day.

Another bonus to shooting handheld is not having to worry about taking your tripod on the plane! Although these days, with newer carbon fiber technology you could buy a very small lightweight tripod for perfectly still images if you’d rather plan your shots out in advance.

If however you’re planning on taking long exposure shots or beautiful planned-out spanning landscapes at sunset – you’ll need a tripod, no matter what.You’ll need to have a higher aperture to keep everything in the image sharp, and you’ll want minimal camera shake. None at all if possible. The less light you’re dealing with – the higher likelihood you’ll want a tripod. Especially if you’re planning night shoots. But you always have to think about how possible it is! If you’re hiking for a long way you’ll need a smaller lighter tripod – but if you’re near transport and you don’t have to carry it far, a more sturdy tripod is preferred.

It’s always a trade off between stability and maneuverability. You need to pick what’s most important to you in each situation!

 

 

 

The Wild Camping Checklist

If you’re taking the time to travel and hike in the great outdoors, why stop there? Wild camping is legal in some of the most beautiful places on earth,  (Please check before you go!)  and is the best way to be ‘one with nature’. You get to experience the outdoors, and take a break from everyday life to make a small trip into an adventure!

Of course things can go wrong, so you should always plan for the worst and pack accordingly! I met someone the other day whose tent broke on day three of a seven day trip, but he said it was the most fun he’s ever had! Ideally we want to avoid anything going wrong – so here’s my list for wild camping survival!

A Good Wild Camp Tent

You don’t want to go out in the wilderness with a pop-up festival tent!

Although it might be easier to pitch and put away, not only will it be awkward to carry as you hike, but it won’t be as windproof or rainproof as you might prefer!

If you’re hiking in unpredictable weather it’s important you bring a tent that’s waterproof, and made in a way that lets wind flow over it. You don’t want to wake up with your pegs ripped up and the tent blowing down a hill whilst you’re soaked through!

You’ll also want to make sure it’s easy to carry – lighter and smaller is better, so don’t pack a tent for more people than you need!

Another important factor is that you’ll want to “leave no trace” when camping – so you may want something brown or green, to blend in with your environment – rather than bright colours that stick out like a sore thumb! (keep in mind that In some cases, a bright tent may be preferable. If you’re camping in potentially dangerous conditions it’s good to be seen!)

A Warm Sleeping Bag

It goes without saying that a good sleeping bag will be the difference between a good and a terrible night’s sleep! You may want to pack light, but trust me, you’ll be fine with extra weight if it means you’ll be warm at night! “better safe than sorry” rings true here. Make sure the sleeping bag is rated at a comfort level that reflects the conditions you’re in, and remember the extreme conditions rating is exactly that! At that point, it’s not about getting a good night’s sleep but about staying alive!

If you can afford it, you ideally want a 100% goose down sleeping bag that will keep you warm, as well as being light and packing down easily. Down is a little out of our price range, so S and I have just bought the Mountain Warehouse Microlite 1400 for our wild camp trip in scotland. Although it’s quite large, it’ll keep us warm at night. The last thing you need when camping is a lack of sleep!

Navigation

A good GPS can be a godsend – they’re loaded with trail maps that show you the correct direction on the fly, so you won’t need to worry about getting lost! They’re also a nice way to track where you’ve been and keep a record of previous hikes.

Unfortunately, as much of a tech-geek as I am, I cannot recommend you rely on your GPS alone! They can run out of battery, and leave you stranded with no idea where you are! So if you’re planning on a longer hike, make sure you always take a physical map and compass, and that you know exactly how to use them! Always keep an eye on your surroundings and pay attention to landmarks so you can find your way back if you need to.

Cooking Equipment

If you’re out in the wild for a while, you need to make sure you take a gas burner, to boil water and to heat food. You need to keep your energy levels high with good, warm food, and make sure you boil any water you find as well as purifying it. Starting a fire in the wild is not advised, and is often illegal so make sure you take your own source of heat!

 

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